Flaxman John Charles Spurrell

#40090, b. 6 September 1842, d. 25 February 1915

Left to right: FJS [Spurrell senior], FS [Spurrell junior], AS [Alfred Spurrell], Capt. Popperwell, HS [Herbert Spurrell], and Sir John Maryon Wilson. Photo obtained from http://subterraneangreeenwich.blogspot.com.au/2011_09_01_archive.html
  • Father: Flaxman Spurrell b. 14 May 1815, d. Dec 1892
  • Mother: Ann Spurrell b. 23 Mar 1818, d. 1 Jan 1896

Individual's Timeline

Birth6 September 1842Flaxman John Charles Spurrell
Death of Mother1 January 1896Ann Spurrell
Marriage27 March 1912Flaxman John Charles Spurrell1
Death25 February 1915Flaxman John Charles Spurrell

Primary events

Secondary circumstances

  • Occupation: Flaxman was Flaxman Charles John Spurrell (6 September 1842 - 25 February 1915), the archaeologist, geologist and photographer, was born in Mile End, Stepney, London, the eldest son of Dr. Flaxman Spurrell, M.D., F.R.C.S., and Ann Spurrell (who were also first cousins). Shortly after his birth, his father moved to Bexley, Kent; later, Flaxman (junior) lived at The Priory, Picardy Road, Belvedere, now home to the Priory Conservative Club. Spurrell Avenue in Bexley was named after Flaxman (junior).

    In the 1860s he began to examine flint implements in and around Crayford in Kent, and over the following decades published a large number of articles for the Kent Archaeological Society (of which his father was a founding member), the Essex Archaeological Society and Royal Archaeological Society, as well as other societies and groups. In 1895 he presented a number of pre-historic remains to the Natural History Museum, and later donated material to the Norwich Castle Museum.

    He was a close friend of the egyptologist William Matthew Flinders Petrie, whom he helped to record discoveries made in, for example, Naqada and Tell el-Amarna in Egypt.

    Flaxman Spurrell was also interested in photography, and some of his photographs are currently held by English Heritage.

    Some years before his death, he retired to Bessingham Manor House in Norfolk, one of the seats of the Spurrell family, and was no longer active in the archaeological world. He died at The Den, Bessingham, in 1915, having married his cousin, Katherine Anne Spurrell, on 27 March 1912.

    Flaxman Spurrell was educated at Epsom College; he was a Fellow of Geological Society from 1868 to 1905 and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries from 1899 to 1910.

    He was a nephew of Rev. Frederick Spurrell and an uncle of the biologist and author Herbert George Flaxman Spurrell.

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Census details

  • He appeared on the census taken on the night of 30th March 1851, living in Belview House, London Road, Bexley, Kent, England in the household of his parents, Flaxman Spurrell and Ann Spurrell. He was 8 years old.
  • He appeared on the census taken on the night of 7th April 1861, living in 1 Picardy Road, Erith, Belvedere, Kent, England in the household of his parents, Flaxman Spurrell and Ann Spurrell. He was 18 years old.
  • He appeared on the census taken on the night of 2nd April 1871, living in Erith, Belvedere, England in the household of his parents, Flaxman Spurrell and Ann Spurrell. He was 28 years old.
  • He appeared on the census taken on the night of 3rd April 1881, living in Erith, Belvedere, England in the household of his parents, Flaxman Spurrell and Ann Spurrell. He was 38 years old.
  • He appeared on the census taken on the night of 5th April 1891, living in Erith, Belvedere, England in the household of his parents, Flaxman Spurrell and Ann Spurrell. He was 48 years old.
  • He appeared on the census taken on the night of 31st March 1901, living in Bessingham, Norfolk, England in the household of his parents, Daniel Spurrell and Sarah Frances Copeman. He was 58 years old.
Some aspects of Flaxman John Charles Spurrell's life. Flaxman was the 'father' of Denehole exploration. According to Wikipedia a denehole is 'is an underground structure consisting of a number of small chalk caves entered by a vertical shaft. The name is given to certain caves or excavations in England, which have been popularly supposed to be due to the Danes or some other of the early northern invaders of the country. The common spelling Dane hole is adduced as evidence of this, and individual names, such as Vortigerns Caves at Margate, and Canutes Gold Mine near Bexley, naturally follow the same theory. The word, however, is probably derived from the Anglo Saxon den, a hole or valley. The lack of evidence found in them has led to long arguments as to their function.'

Family of Flaxman John Charles Spurrell and Catherine Anne Spurrell

Citations

  1. Free parish registers, online http://www.freereg.org.uk,      Norfolk
    Place     Bessingham
    Church     St Mary
    RegisterNumber     68
    MarriageDate     27 Mar 1912
    GroomForename     Flaxman Charles John
    GroomSurname     SPURRELL
    GroomAge     
    GroomParish     Bessingham
    GroomCondition     Bachelor
    GroomOccupation     Gardener
    GroomAbode     
    BrideForename     Catherine Annie
    BrideSurname     SPURRELL
    BrideAge     
    BrideParish     Bessingham
    BrideCondition     Spinster
    BrideOccupation     
    BrideAbode     
    GroomFatherForename     Flaxman
    GroomFatherSurname     SPURRELL
    GroomFatherOccupation     Farmer
    BrideFatherForename     Daniel
    BrideFatherSurname     SPURRELL
    BrideFatherOccupation     Farmer
    WitnessOneForename     Edmund
    WitnessOneSurname     SPURRELL
    WitnessTwoForename     Mary Jane
    WitnessTwoSurname     MILES
    Notes     
    FileNumber     7963.
  2. Free parish registers, online http://www.freereg.org.uk,      Norfolk
    Place     Bessingham
    Church     St Marys
    RegisterNumber     267
    BurialDate     01 Mar 1915
    Forename     Flaxman Charles John
    Relationship     
    Rel1MaleForename     
    Rel1FemaleForename     
    Rel1Surname     
    Surname     SPURRELL
    Age     72
    Abode     Bessingham
    Notes     
    FileNumber     7962.