Edwin Balls

#12703, b. 1 November 1857, d. March 1931

Individual's Timeline

Birth RegSeptember 1857Edwin Balls1
Birth1 November 1857Edwin Balls
Christening1857Edwin Balls2
MarriageMarch 1886Edwin Balls3
Probate1 November 1895John Balls
Marriage of Daughter9 January 1913Mabel Dorothy Balls4
Marriage of SonJune 1914Frank Hilton Balls
Marriage of Son27 January 1916Alec Edwyn Balls5,6
Death10 February 1931Edwin Balls7
Death RegMarch 1931Edwin Balls8
Probate13 March 1931Edwin Balls

Primary events

Secondary circumstances

Census details

  • He appeared on the census taken on the night of 7th April 1861, living in Southwold Road West, Wrentham, Suffolk, England in the household of his parents, John Balls and Harriett Ann Lincoln. He was 3 years old.
  • In 1871 in Chelsea Edwin Balls was included in the household of William Cricker PALMER and his family, who was a 'french florist'. Charles and Edwin were lodgers.
  • In 1881 in Streatham Edwin Balls was included in the household of William C PALMER and his family. Edwin was the only boarder. Note this is the same family as the previous family.
  • In the census taken on the night of 5th April 1891, Edwin was the head of the household and Lily was his wife. The address was 53 Rosaville Road, Fulham, Greater London, England. Their children Frank and Alec were living with them.
  • In the census taken on the night of 31st March 1901, Edwin was the head of the household and Lily was his wife. The address was 41 Fernhouse Road, Fulham, Greater London, England. Their children Frank, Alec and Mabel were living with them, along with Lily's unmarried sister, Ada Shrimpton.
  • In the census taken on the night of 2nd April 1911, Edwin was the head of the household and Lily was his wife. The address was Fulham, England Their children Frank, Alec and Mabel were living with them.
Some aspects of Edwin Balls's life. Edwin was an Artificial Florist. What follows is a story from a USA newspaper from 1891 regarding the booming fashion.

ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS are the fashion now, nearly all women and girls wearing them upon hats and not a few upon clothing. The practice is of comparatively recent growth. Ten years ago all the flowers needed in this country were made up by three or four concerns in this city, all small and of foreign origin. Now there are millions of dollars invested in the business, and it Is more than likely, manufacturers say, the business will keep on growing.

It may not be at all pleasant to the patriotic American woman to be told that the present craze for aniliciai flowers has been imported, but such is the case. The love of decoration is inherent, of course, in all women. In Europe, and particularly in France, an Immense quantity of flowers was made up each year, for the decoration of the person and Clothes. It was an enterprising firm of Frenchmen that imported the custom here in. In speaking about the growth of the trade a dealer said yesterday; "Just after the War of the Rebellion there was a great rage in this country for artificial flowers, but generally they were of the large and gaudy description. As the people became more refined, however, and wealth increased, the gaudy artificial flowers had to go. Few of them were in demand from that time. Then there was a glut in the French market, and one French firm exported some of its surplus. They took like hot cukes, particularly in tho growing West. The year following, establishments popped up everywhere, and a rivalry grew up between artificial flowprs and feathers. Now feathers and flowers have about equal hold upon the public "

We expect a very busy spring this year. The work already made up is something wonderful. The designs are of the most unique and graceful pattern. This city, notwithstanding the fact that the women of the West wear more artilicial flowers than their sisters in the East, is the headquarters of the trade, just as Paris is of the Eastern Hemisphere. Dealers go to Paris for their purchases from far-off Arabia, Persia and the Soudan, and carry back not a few flowers. Who wear them in those countries? The women, to be sure; eilher in their hair or corsages, or trailing from their robes.

"The Western girl likes her artificial flowers in strings to brighten the big flat hats they wear in the West. Both cheap and expensive flowers are worked up that way, showing that the taste of the poorly paid shop-girl and her wealthy sister is for flowers, differing only as to the quality."

"Why is it that there is such a craze for flowers?" a manufacturer said. "I can hardly tell. We know it is here, and spend little time in cogitating for the why and wherefore of it. It is enough for us that woman wants artifial flowers, and we make haste to give her enough of them. It is not upon her dress alone that she is wearing the flowers, but she has gone into decorating her home with them. It began with those large pots of dark, velvety, heavy leaves, but now it has got to bright colors, delicate tints and the very poetry of shading."— N. Y. World.
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Portrait of Thomas Beckett's grandmother, Mrs Hoyt, taken in London, England, November 1891. (No relation, just showing one of the uses made in London of these artificial flowers, see exhibit)

Part of a collection of glass plate negatives taken by Dr Thomas George Beckett, doctor, pioneering radiologist and amateur photographer between 1891 and 1910. The collection is primarily of Beckett's family, friends, homes, and towns and suburbs where Beckett and his family lived, including Charlton in central Victoria and Northcote & South Yarra, suburbs of Melbourne, Victoria.

Thomas Beckett and his family visited relatives in England in 1891. Grandmother Hoyt sitting in living room. Wall in rear displays family photographs and a stuffed platypus. She is wearing a bonnet covered in artificial flowers.

Note that the stuffed platypus would be something of wonder for the times. A very Australian item to be found in a London home. Maybe it was a recent gift brought from Victoria by the Dr and his family.9

Children of Edwin Balls and Lily Shrimpton

Citations

  1. Free UK BDM index from 1837, online http://freebmd.rootsweb.com, Balls      Edwin            Blything      4a     604.
  2. International Genealogical Index (IGI), parents:     John Balls,? Harriet Ann
    name:     Edwin Balls
    gender:     Male
    baptism/christening date:     1857
    baptism/christening place:     , HUNTINGFIELD, SUFFOLK, ENGLAND
    father's name:     John Balls
    mother's name:     Harriet Ann
    indexing project (batch) number:     C13202-2
    system origin:     England-VR
    source film number:     952451.
  3. Free UK BDM index from 1837, online http://freebmd.rootsweb.com, SHRIMPTON      Lily            Hackney      1b     479.
  4. Website Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com) "Balls
    Name:      Mabel Dorothy Balls
    Birth Year:      abt 1892
    Event Type:      Marriage
    Event Date:      9 Jan 1913
    Age:      21
    Church:      Fulham Congregational Church
    Burough:      Hammersmith and Fulham
    County:      London
    Father:      Edwin Balls
    Spouse:      Harold William Butler
    Spouse Age:      25
    Spouse Father:      William Richard Butler."
  5. Find my past web sites, online http://www.findmypast.com or http://www.findmypast.com.au, First name(s)      Alec Edwyn
    Last name      Balls
    Birth year      1889
    Birth date      20 Jul 1889
    Birth parish      Fulham
    Birth county      Middlesex
    Occupation      Carpenter And Joiner
    Attestation year      1916
    Attestation date      02 Feb 1916
    Service number      211241
    Marriage year      1916
    Marriage date      27 Jan 1916
    Spouse's first name(s)      Lucy
    Child's first name(s)      Suzette
    Child's birth date      25 Sep 1917
    Archive reference      AIR 79/1898
    Next of kin first name(s)      Lucy,Suzette
    Next of kin last name      Balls
    Record set      British Royal Air Force, Airmen's service records 1912-1939
    Category      Military, armed forces & conflict
    Subcategory      Service Records
    Collections from      Great Britain.
  6. Find my past web sites, online http://www.findmypast.com or http://www.findmypast.com.au, First name(s)      ALEC E
    Last name      BALLS
    Marriage quarter      1
    Marriage year      1916
    Registration month      -
    MarriageFinder™      ALEC E BALLS married
    LUCY V SMITH
    Spouse's last name      SMITH
    District      FULHAM
    District number      -
    County      London
    Country      England
    Volume      1A
    Page      855
    Record set      England & Wales marriages 1837-2008
    Category      Birth, Marriage, Death & Parish Records
    Subcategory      Marriages & divorces
    Collections from      Great Britain.
  7. Website Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com) "England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966 about Edwin Balls
    Name:      Edwin Balls
    Probate Date:      13 Mar 1931
    Death Date:      10 Feb 1931
    Death Place:      Middlesex, England
    Registry:      London, England."
  8. Find my past web sites, online http://www.findmypast.com or http://www.findmypast.com.au, Civil Registration event: Death
    Name:      BALLS, Edwin
    Registration district:      Hackney
    County:      London
    Brentford Mar qtr 1931 3a/273.
  9. Misc web sites, online see Citation Detail, http://cdnc.ucr.edu
    San Francisco Call, Volume 69, Number 133, 12 April 1891.