Richard Chugg1

#18612, b. 4 March 1798, d. 8 April 1861

The Sir William Wallace Inn was built at Franklin Village in 1843, then run by Richard Chugg. This inn was attached to Mr. Chugg’s 800 acre property in a paddock back from the main Hobart road. Later the inn and property became the Tallentyre estate, the home of Fred Grubb and his wife until it was demolished. . From http://www.nationaltrusttas.org.au

Individual's Timeline

Birth1798Richard Chugg1
Christening4 March 1798Richard Chugg2
Marriage13 July 1824Richard Chugg3,4,5
Marriage2 August 1836Sarah O'Neill6,7
Death26 April 1838Ann Sydes8
Deathbefore 1841Ann Chugg
Marriage27 January 1845Richard Chugg9,10,11
Death15 May 1858Mary Chugg
Death8 April 1861Richard Chugg12
Marriage18 May 1870Henry Chugg13,14,11

Primary events

Secondary circumstances

  • Occupation: Richard was most likely a tin miner before becoming a murderer's assistant. After that a convict, a transportee, a (very substantial) farmer and a publican of the William Wallace Inn.
  • Immigration: In November 1820Richard Chugg emigrated on the ship 'Caladonia' to Hobart Australia.
  • Will: Richard Chugg left a will in 1862 in Tasmania, Australia, Will - Richard made a will, his last, on 5 December 1859, after the death of his wife, Mary. At this time, his eldest son, Richard William, was still a minor at 18 years of age. Richard appointed two executors – his son, Richard William, but only when he had attained the age of 21, and his first wife’s half-brother, Kennedy Murray. However, Kennedy died before Richard, so Richard William became the sole executor, even though he was only 20 years of age at the time of his father’s death.

    However, there must have been someone acting in the position of executor until Richard William turned 21 as he was appointed executor on 23 May 1862 by the Supreme Court of Van Diemen’s Land. Even though Richard left £500 in trust for each of his sons and daughters, at the time of his appointment as executor, Richard William declared that he believed that his father’s estate did not exceed the value of £500.

    Richard William and Kennedy Murray were also listed as guardians of Richard’s other children, a role Richard William must have taken on after the death of his father. The youngest child, William, would have been only 7 years of age. Emma may also have helped out. There is no mention of Emma or any other children older than Richard William in the will.

    Richard’s sons were to get their £500 as a lump sum payment when they turned 21 years of age. However, his daughters, and their daughters in turn, were to be given the interest from the investment of their £500 and Richard stipulated that this interest was to be given “into her own proper hands for her separate use and independent of any husband”. Any remaining monies were to be invested and put “towards the maintenance education or advancement in life” of his children.

    It is possible that Richard’s children did not receive the full benefit of his will, if as Richard William stated to the supreme court, there was not £500 total in Richard’s personal estate.16

Census details

  • Richard Chugg was named in the census taken in Australia in 1841 (TNA copy).. The address was listed as Perth, Norfolk Plains, Tasmania, Australia. Census details

    Census taken on 1 January 1842, Richard’s household in the parish of Perth, Norfolk Plains is listed as having eight members, one of whom is a boy aged between 7 and 14 years. The members of Richard’s household were listed as follows, except the names have been deduced and added here:

    · Richard, married male between the ages of 21 and 45, free, Anglican, land proprietor.

    · Mary, married female between the ages of 21 and 45, arrived free, Roman Catholic.

    · Overseer/farm labourer, unmarried male between the ages of 21 and 45, free, gardener, stockman and person employed in agriculture.

    · Farm labourer, unmarried male between the ages of 21 and 45, Ticket of Leave holder, gardener, stockman and person employed in agriculture.

    · Farm labourer, unmarried male between the ages of 21 and 45, Ticket of Leave holder, gardener, stockman and person employed in agriculture.

    · Richard William, male under the age of 2 years, born in the colony, Anglican.

    · Male between the ages of 7 and 14 years, born in the colony.

    · Emma Theresa, female between the ages of 2 and 7 years, born in the colony, Roman Catholic.

    The denominations of the three farm labourers and the boy are difficult to assign – two were Anglican, one was Wesleyan Methodist and the other was Roman Catholic.

    If the boy was the Roman Catholic, then it is likely he was a relative of Mary’s. It is unlikely that Mary was his mother as she would have been 13 years or younger when she bore him. He may have been a younger brother. It is also possible that he was the son of Richard and Ann, but he is not mentioned as the eldest child in Richard’s will.

    Richard’s place of residence at the time of the census was Brine(?) Farm. The house was built of wood and had been completed. The eight people listed on the census generally resided at the Farm. Thus, at this time, Richard was a farmer.

    All above is from Trudy Mae COWLEY family tree - http://freepages.family.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tcowley/Cowley/RichardCHUGG.htm.
Some aspects of Richard Chugg's life. The Rocky Path between Penury to Plenty

On 11 December 1839, the Office of the Board of Assignment assigned Richard CHUGG of Norfolk Plains one convict from the Launceston Prisoners' Barracks. Presumably this convict was a labourer to help Richard work the land he was farming at the time.

On 26 October 1840, Richard submitted a land grant application to the Government for 66 acres of land in the district of Cornwall. The following notice from the Commissioner's Office, dated 20 November 1840, appeared in the Hobart Town Gazette on 20 November 1840.

Notice is hereby given, that the following claims for Grants will be ready for examination by the Commissioners appointed for that purpose, upon or immediately after the 20th day of January next, on or before which date any caveat or counter claim must be entered.

RICHARD CHUGG. Cornwall. 66A-2R-0P (Originally Patrick Cain, who sold to the applicant.- Claim dated 26th October, 1840.) Bounded on the north west by 5 chains 20 links extending south-westerly from the south-east angle of a location to Daniel Mackay along a location to Henry Priaulx, on the south west by 15 chains south-easterly also along that location, on the south east by 44 chains 40 links north-easterly also along that location, on the north-east by 15 chains north-westerly also along that location, and thence on the north west by a south-westerly line also along that location and Daniel Mackay's location to its south-east angle as aforesaid, all the angles being right angles.

From the description it is difficult to tell where this land was actually located. However, it is likely that Richard borrowed the money to buy the property as in 1841 Richard was declared insolvent. An article in the HTC and the VDL Gazette on 13 April 1841 read:

In the matter of the Insolvency of Richard Chugg, of Launceston, in Van Diemen’s Land, Farmer – to the creditors of the above-named Richard Chugg, and also to the said Richard Chugg himself – Notice is hereby given, that William Stammers Button and Jonathan Stammers Waddell, being creditors of the said Richard Chugg, did this day present a petition to William Gardner Sams, Esq., the Commissioner of Insolvent Estates for Launceston, setting forth the matters and things required by the Act of Council entitled “an Act to make provision for the more effectual distribution of Insolvent estates” and praying that he, the said Richard Chugg, might be declared insolvent, and that his estate and effects might be distributed generally amongst his creditors, and the said petition having been heard before the said Commissioner this day, he the said Commissioner did declare the said Richard Chugg insolvent within the meaning of the said Act of Council, and appointed John Atkinson, of Launceston aforesaid, Esquire, provisional assignee of the estate and effects of the said insolvent, and further appointed Wednesday, the fifth day of May next, at the Court House of Launceston, at ten o’clock in the forenoon, for the first meeting of the creditors of the said insolvent, and for otherwise proceeding in the matter of such insolvency – Dated this twelfth day of April, 1841.

Gleadow & Henty,

Solicitors to the said Insolvency

Circa 1844 Richard Chugg owned an inn at Franklin Village which was located on his 800 acre property in a paddock back from the road and another inn nearby (the Sir William Wallace Hotel). This building is no longer there.

From 1847 to 1851 Richard was the licensee of the Sir William Wallace Hotel in Franklin Village, Launceston. He gave up the license for this hotel on 3 May 1852.

Publicans’ Licenses, Launceston. At a quarterly meeting of justices of the peace, held at the court house, Launceston, this day, the following transfers of Licences and permission to continue a license to retail Wines and Spirits were allowed: From Richard Chugg to William Henry Parkinson, The Sir William Wallace Inn, Franklin Village.
Dated this 3rd day of May 1852.

Circa 1847 Richard Chugg and Britton Jones gave the land for St Oswald’s Church and cemetery at Franklin Village, free of all charge. The church was completed in time for Christmas services in 1848.

In the Valuation Rolls for the districts of Longford and Morven for 1858, Richard is listed as owning and occupying the following property:

· 1280 acres of forest land in Stringy Bark Forest near Longford (supposedly called Stinking Springs) valued at £64

· 100 acres of agricultural land at Talisker valued at £75

· 300 acres of pastoral land at Franklin Village valued at £50

· a house and shop at Franklin Village occupying less than 1 acre valued at £30

He is also listed as owning the following property:

· 3 houses on land of less than 1 acre at Franklin Village valued at £40 – unoccupied

· a house on land of less than 1 acre at Franklin Village valued at £15 – occupied by John Crofton

· a house on land of less than 1 acre at Franklin Village valued at £10 – occupied by William Burley

· a house on land of less than 1 acre at Franklin Village valued at £15 – occupied by Thomas Hall

· a house and blacksmith’s shop on land of less than 1 acre at Franklin Village valued at £40 – occupied by John Drake

· a house on land of less than 1 acre at Franklin Village valued at £15 – occupied by John Smith

· a house on land of less than 1 acre at Franklin Village valued at £15 – occupied by John Sides (probably a relative of Richard’s first wife, Ann SYDES)

· a house on land of less than 1 acre at Franklin Village valued at £10 – occupied by William Thomas

Thus, in 1858, Richard owned 11 houses, a shop, a blacksmith’s shop and 300 acres of land, all at Franklin Village, in addition to 100 acres of land at Talisker and 1280 acres of forest near Longford. The total value of this property was £379. It is likely that Richard built the houses he rented from timber from his forested land near Longford and rented them out for income – an early property developer!
Brushes with the LAW

Trial - Richard was convicted of murder and tried at Monmouth Summer Assizes on Wednesday, 18 August 1819. He was convicted, along with Edward JONES, of aiding and abetting William OWEN in the murder of John GUNTER. OWEN struck GUNTER with a hatchet and killed him.

All three initially were sentenced to be hanged the following Monday, 23 August 1819, and their bodies to be “dissected and anatomised”. However, Richard’s sentence at least was later reprieved and commuted to transportation for life. Why his sentence was commuted to transportation is not known.

The following information about the offence is extracted from Chugg (1998). The murder occurred on 24 May 1819 at Llanvihangel Crucorney which is located approximately six kilometers north of Abergavenny in Wales. CHUGG, JONES and OWEN were all listed as labourers from the parish of Llantilio Pertholy, County Monmouth, Wales. All three were also indicted for breaking and entering GUNTER’s house and stealing four shillings and sixpence.

According to the jury’s statement, OWEN used a hatchet worth one shilling to strike GUNTER on the right side of the head whilst holding him. The mortal wound was five inches in breadth and 2 inches in depth and there was a lot of bruising. GUNTER died instantly. JONES and CHUGG were said to be present aiding, abetting, assisting, comforting and maintaining OWEN to perpetrate the murder of malicious aforethought.

The above details are from Trudy Mae COWLEY’s family tree pages - http://freepages.family.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tcowley/Cowley/RichardCHUGG.htm

There is much more about Richard, well worth the read.

In addition to the above, the report in the Newcastle Courant dated 4th Sept 1819, indicates that the murder was planned. "John GUNTER was a poor shoemaker. OWENS had stolen a gamecock from GUNTER 2 years previously, and GUNTER had forced OWENS to compensate him 1 guinea. OWENS had vowed to get even. The 3 men went to GUNTER's house at midnight, stripped naked in the field next door and blackened their faces. They then tried to hand GUNTER, but the ceiling beam was too low. OWENS then struck GUNTER with the hatchet. 2 of the men were executed, but Richard was transported for life. The judge believed he, at the age of 18, got into this because of the bad company he had been keeping. (note from Shirley: If they were going to hang GUNTER, why did they strip naked? This is long before CSI:Wales)

His Hulk report from the Bellerophon shows no adverse statements, and also shows that he was sent to NSW on the 'Caledonian 23rd June 1820. He arrived at Bellerophon 2nd November 1819 with 4 others, but neither of his fellow accused were with him.

Then there is the National Trust site, which has details of Franklin Village, where Richard’s 800-acre farm and pub were located. http://www.nationaltrusttas.org.au/f_village/pages/franklin_village.htm


Richard came to the notice of the Launceston constabulary several times after he received his Conditional Pardon, as listed in the following table (CON 78/1).


Breach of Quarter Sessions Act, Fined £1 and costs, 16 August 1839
Breach of the Publicans Act, Fined 10/- and costs, 30 August 1839
Breach of the Publicans Act, Fined £2 and costs, 27 September 1839
Breach of the Publicans Act, Fined 10/- and costs, 12 November 1839
Breach of Publicans Act, Charge dismissed, 12 November 1839
Breach of Quarter Sessions Act, Fined £1 and costs, 11 December 1839
Breach of the Quarter Sessions Act, Fined £1 and costs, 11 February 1840
Breach of the Publicans Act, Fined £1 and costs, 27 March 1840
Breach of the Quarter Sessions Act,
Charge dismissed, 11 April 1840
Breach of Quarter Sessions Act, Charge dismissed (twice), 30 June 1840
Breach of Publicans Act, Fined £5 and costs, 30 June 1840
Breach of Publicans Act, Withdrawn on paying costs,

Richard was deemed insolvent around 1841, and had some land sold to satisfy creditors.

In the Launceston Examiner dated July 1855 a report that James STEDMAN had been charged with assaulting Richard with intent to rob.

In the Cornwall Chronicle, dated March 1856 there is a long report regarding the licensing of premises at Franklin Village to Richard. The licence was denied, and Richard later appealed. Other, earlier, reports show that Richard held the licence for The William Wallace in Franklin Village for a number of years.

In the Launceston Examiner dated 9th July 1857, Richard was sued for non-payment of a debt for goods (£24) delivered to him by a person who had since died. This person’s executor was suing Richard on behalf of the estate, as he believed that Richard had not paid for the goods. Richard admitted to debts of £7, and the Jury found for the plaintiff to the sum of £10/6.

From the above, and from the many other reports in the local papers, I would say that Richard was a tough man and a hardheaded businessman. ‘Give no quarter’. In 1855, he was 57 years old, but he managed to thwart a highway robbery attempt. He was willing to go to court over what he deemed to be either a false claim for monies he did not owe (but whilst admitting to some financial indebtedness to the estate) or he saw an opportunity to get out of paying a true debt that would be difficult to prove. He also appealed the licensing decision that went against him, notwithstanding his poor record regarding breaches of the licensing act some years earlier.

Richard’s first wife was Ann SYDES. They married in 1824, and Ann then disappears from the records. Richard was living in the same house as Mary HICKS (nee BIRD) in early 1842. A child, Richard William CHUGG, was born in 1841. Presumably, Mary was his mother. A second child, Henry was born in 1844, and then Richard and Mary married. They had 3 more children in the next 9 years.

Mary’s first husband was William HICKS, and Mary had at least one child by him, Emma Theresa in 1839. This girl was with her living in Richard’s house in 1841. I have not sighted any records that explain why Richard and Mary waited until 1845 to marry. No death records for of their first spouses have been found, either so it is possible one or other of them was still alive.

Richard has been well covered by others. Most of the above is information I have obtained from various web sources, He is included here as he is a cousin in the tree. Robert CHUGG born 1626 is his 3rd Great Great Uncle.

George Marion CHUGG, my Grandchildren’s direct ancestor, came to Australia in 1882, some 60 years after Richard was sent. I wonder if he ever knew he had a 4th cousin who was a convict?


Brushes with the LAW

Trial - Richard was convicted of murder and tried at Monmouth Summer Assizes on Wednesday, 18 August 1819. He was convicted, along with Edward JONES, of aiding and abetting William OWEN in the murder of John GUNTER. OWEN struck GUNTER with a hatchet and killed him.

All three initially were sentenced to be hanged the following Monday, 23 August 1819, and their bodies to be “dissected and anatomised”. However, Richard’s sentence at least was later reprieved and commuted to transportation for life. Why his sentence was commuted to transportation is not known.

The following information about the offence is extracted from Chugg (1998). The murder occurred on 24 May 1819 at Llanvihangel Crucorney which is located approximately six kilometres north of Abergavenny in Wales. CHUGG, JONES and OWEN were all listed as labourers from the parish of Llantilio Pertholy, County Monmouth, Wales. All three were also indicted for breaking and entering GUNTER’s house and stealing four shillings and sixpence.

According to the jury’s statement, OWEN used a hatchet worth one shilling to strike GUNTER on the right side of the head whilst holding him. The mortal wound was five inches in breadth and 2 inches in depth and there was a lot of bruising. GUNTER died instantly. JONES and CHUGG were said to be present aiding, abetting, assisting, comforting and maintaining OWEN to perpetrate the murder of malicious aforethought.



Convict Number 13404
Surname Chugg
Given Name(s) Richard
See Surname
See Given Name(s)
Ship Name Caledonia (1)
Departure Port Portsmouth
Departure Date 10/07/1820
Arrival Date 17/11/1820
Conduct Record CON31/6
Indent
Description List CON23/1
Muster Roll CSO1/96/2284

The convict application for permission to marry (partial index so far) on
the Archives Office site does not show any Chugg listing.


Brushes with the LAW

Upon arrival, Richard would have been assigned but there is no record of his assignment, though on the Muster Roll (CSO 1/96/2284 p.102) taken on board Caledonia on 22 November 1820, the initials PD are inscribed next to Richard's name (as well as next to the names of several other convicts). Thus, Richard was taken to Port Dalrymple for assignment from there. On 17 October 1823 he was working as an assigned servant for Mr STEVENSON in the Launceston district (CON 79/1).

The first time Richard is noted in the official records after disembarkation is on 4 April 1823, when assigned to public works and charged with drawing rations for a man in the hospital. As punishment, he was dismissed from his situation as overseer. It is possible that this crime was opportunistic and brought about through hunger.

Prior to being granted his conditional pardon, convict records note that Richard was assigned in the Launceston area on 11 November 1834 and then assigned on 12 December 1834 in the Norfolk Plains area.

Richard traveled to Hobart on 2 May 1836 to attend the wedding of Thomas SYDES, Ann’s younger brother. Did Ann go too? And on 13 March 1837, Richard was a witness at the marriage of Thomas ELDRIDGE and Sarah WILLIAMS in Launceston; friends presumably.

Richard came to the notice of the Launceston constabulary several times after he received his Conditional Pardon, as listed in the following table (CON 78/1).


Breach of Quarter Sessions Act, Fined £1 and costs, 16 August 1839
Breach of the Publicans Act, Fined 10/- and costs, 30 August 1839
Breach of the Publicans Act, Fined £2 and costs, 27 September 1839
Breach of the Publicans Act, Fined 10/- and costs, 12 November 1839
Breach of Publicans Act, Charge dismissed, 12 November 1839
Breach of Quarter Sessions Act, Fined £1 and costs, 11 December 1839
Breach of the Quarter Sessions Act, Fined £1 and costs, 11 February 1840
Breach of the Publicans Act, Fined £1 and costs, 27 March 1840
Breach of the Quarter Sessions Act,
Charge dismissed, 11 April 1840
Breach of Quarter Sessions Act, Charge dismissed (twice), 30 June 1840
Breach of Publicans Act, Fined £5 and costs, 30 June 1840
Breach of Publicans Act, Withdrawn on paying costs.


Brushes with the LAW

Freedom - Richard sought indulgence for his Ticket of Leave on 2 July 1829 from the police. He received his Ticket of Leave from them on 7 July 1829. This was sent to the Secretary on 10 August and approved by the Governor on 19 October 1829. A notice from the Colonial Secretary's Office dated 22 October 1829 stating Richard had received his Ticket of Leave was printed in the Hobart Town Gazette on 24 October 1829. It gave instructions on how Richard was to obtain his Ticket of Leave, living so far from Hobart.

The parties will, therefore, apply at this office, for their respective Ticket, on the 23d of November next, but, in cases where from residence in the interior, it may not be convenient to repair to Hobart-town, the description of the person may be taken by the nearest Police Magistrate, and transmitted by him; and, upon its receipt, accompanied by a Statement of the man's intended residence, the Ticket will be completed, and returned to the Magistrate for delivery.

Richard was granted Conditional Pardon No. 673 on 27 March 1836 (though one convict record records the date as 24 February 1835). Government Notice number 74 from the Colonial Secretary's Office dated 30 March 1836, published in the Hobart Town Gazette of 1 April 1836 reads:

The Lieutenant Governor has been pleased to direct that the names of the following individuals who have received Absolute or Conditional remissions of their Sentences and of which His Majesty's allowance has been signified, shall be published for general information.

The individuals in whose favor the Pardons have been granted will therefore apply at the Muster Master's Office, Hobart Town, or to that of a Police Magistrate in the Interior, in order that the Instruments of Pardon may be forthwith issued as each person until possessed of such Document is liable to be treated as a prisoner of the Crown.

CONDITIONAL PARDONS
Richard Chugg

Then on 21 September 1839 he was granted Free Pardon No. 481. This was announced in the Hobart Town Gazette on Friday, 13 September 1839 (Government Notice No.203 from the Colonial Secretary's Office dated 12 September 1839):

Memoranda of Pardon have been issued for the following convicts until Her Majesty's pleasure be known:-

FREE PARDON
309 Richard Chugg, Caledonia.

Commemoration

Richard Chugg's headstone in the St Andrew's Cemetery reads
Sacred to the memory of Mary
the beloved wife of Richard Chugg
who departed this life
May 15 1858 aged 40 years

also

Richard Chugg who died
April 8th 1861 aged 64 years.
His death was commemorated by an obituary in the Launceston newspapers after 10 April 1861 in Cornwall Chronicle, Tasmania, Australia, Richard’s death notice in the Cornwall Chronicle read:

On the 9th instant, of a fit of Apoplexy, Mr Richard Chugg, aged 64 years, deeply regretted by a large circle of friends. The funeral will leave Mr Cole’s, Sand Hill, Launceston, on Thursday (tomorrow), at half past 11 o’clock, a.m., and from thence proceed to Evandale, when friends are respectfully invited to attend.
John Simpson, Undertaker
Richard died in Launceston on 10 April 1861 of apoplexy. He was aged 64 years. The informant was John Simpson, undertaker. His death was registered on 12 April 1861. His death notice in The Mercury read:

CHUGG – April 9, at Launceston, Mr. Richard Chugg, aged 64 years.

Research Notes

  • Research note 01: richard was on norfolk island. Worth getting the book.
  • Research note 02: Richard owned an allotment in Perth Tasmania in 1861.
  • Research note 03: Richard had an ad in the Launceston Courier dated 17th May 1841, to the effect that he had created a Trust to John ATKINSON, of Launceston, on behalf of his creditors, and that if said creditors wanted a piece of it they had to apply within 6 months. See exhibit. In April that same year, William Stammers Hutton and Jonathan Sanmmers Waddell had placed an ad to advise Richard and other creditors they were going to declare him insolvent. In September 1844, Richard was forced to auction 100 acres in Norfolk Plains.
  • Research note 04: The relationship between Richard and my grandchildren, Madison and Samuel.

    * Officially, it is 4th cousin, 6 times removed.
    * The common ancestral line is Edward CHUGG and Thomasin BOYLE. They married in 1635 in Devonshire.
    * Madison's line is descended from John CHUGG (a grandson of Edward and Thomasin) and Mary PARMINTER. The family were located in Devonshire for many generations, as farmers until one, Richard born 1826, became a lead and coal miner. His son George Marion CHUGG, born 1849 in Combe Martin, Devonshire, was first a soldier, stationed in the Tower of London in 1871, then a carpenter who later became a furniture dealer. Dealer in this case indicates either a wholesale or a retail operation.
    * He married Harriet WICKHAM in Brighton Sussex in 1872, and they had produced at least 5 children in Sussex before the 1881 census. The address was 2 Norman House, with no street address but a thorough look at the 1881 Cuckfield census in context, page by page around them, should give a good indication of the location of the place they were living. Thereby enabling a street view in Google to be captured.
    * In 1882, the family came to Australia as assisted migrants. George was a 32-year-old carpenter from Devon whose parents were both dead, and Harriet his wife who was 30 and from Sussex. Harriet's mother Harriet Wickam was alive and living in Sussex. Both could read and write. They had 4 children with them. Their first-born died as an infant. They stated a religion, but it is difficult to read, possibly ASdly.
    * In 1884, they were living in 16 Lambert Street, Camperdown NSW. Whatever was there then is long gone. 3 more children, all boys, were born in Australia. By 1903, the family had relocated to Tunstall in Victoria.
    * Dorothy May CHUGG is their granddaughter, and is Madison and Sam’s great grandmother.
    * Richard's line comes down from grandson of Edward and Thomasin named Richard, born 1700, married to Sarah HARRIS 1725. The family were in Devonshire for a few generations, then a Phillip CHUGG b 1771, married Mary Jane SMITH in 1796 in Ilfracombe, Devonshire. They had at least 5 children in Ilfracombe before 1805. I cannot find Philip in 1841 and 1851 census, but he died in Cardiff, Wales, in 1860. I believe his wife Mary was in Neath Glamorgan Wales with her daughter and son in law and their family in 1851. This daughter would have been born in Swansea, Wales in 1817, meaning that the family moved to Wales some time between 1805 and 1817, but this last bit is pure speculation. I do not know the DOB of Mary Jane, or her death date. One possible death would be Sep qtr 1857 on Barnstaple.
    * It is Richard, the 2nd son of Philip CHUGG and Mary Jane SMITH, who came to Australia as the convict, and who settled in northern Tasmania.

Family of Richard Chugg and Ann Sydes

Children of Richard Chugg and Mary Bird

Citations

  1. Conclusion of, Shirley.
  2. International Genealogical Index (IGI), https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JMR7-LFD
    name: Richard Chugg
    gender: Male
    baptism/christening date: 04 Mar 1798
    baptism/christening place: ILFRACOMBE,DEVON,ENGLAND
    birth date:
    birthplace:
    death date:
    name note:
    race:
    father's name: Philip Chugg
    father's birthplace:
    father's age:
    mother's name: Mary
    mother's birthplace:
    mother's age:
    indexing project (batch) number: C05121-1
    system origin: England-ODM
    source film number: 916849
    reference number:
    Collection: "England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," Richard Chugg, 1798.
  3. Tasmanian Archives database: Surname: CHUGG
    Given Names: RICHARD
    Event: Marriage
    Father/Spouse Surname: SYDES
    Mother/Spouse Given Names: ANN
    Day: 13
    Month: 7
    Year: 1824
    Age:
    Sex: M
    Spouse Age:
    Spouse Sex: F
    Registration Place: LAUNCESTON
    Registration Number: 769/1824
    Reference: RGD 36.
  4. Max Chugg, "eMail from Max Chugg Tasmania," e-mail to Shirley Elrick, various, Ann and Richard were married at St Johns, Launceston, on 13/7/1824, cchurch record 769, John Youl Chaplain.
  5. International Genealogical Index (IGI), Australia, Tasmania, Civil Registration, 1803-1933, All localities (combined), Marriages, RGD 36/01. Marriages, 180... (pre-civil registration), Image 152, cert number 769.
  6. Max Chugg, "eMail from Max Chugg Tasmania," e-mail to Shirley Elrick, various, Thomas Sydes born 9/1/1811 Norfolk Island, died 2/9/1872 Westbury, Tasmania. Married Sarah O’Neill, St David’s Hobart, 2/8/1836.
  7. International Genealogical Index (IGI), Australia, Tasmania, Civil Registration, 1803-1933, All localities (combined), Marriages, RGD 36/01. Marriages, 180... (pre-civil registration), Image 7, cert number 3160.
  8. Misc web sites, online see Citation Detail, http://www.eggsa.org/newspapers/index.php/…
  9. Tasmanian Archives database: Surname: CHUGG
    Given Names: RICHARD
    Event: Marriage
    Father/Spouse Surname: HICKS
    Mother/Spouse Given Names: MARY
    Day: 27
    Month: 1
    Year: 1845
    Age: 45
    Sex: M
    Spouse Age: 23
    Spouse Sex: F
    Registration Place: LAUNCESTON
    Registration Number: 2238Q/1845
    Reference: RGD 37.
  10. International Genealogical Index (IGI), https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XTCP-M4W
    groom's name: Richard Chugg
    groom's birth date: 1800
    groom's birthplace:
    groom's age: 45
    bride's name: Mary Hicks
    bride's birth date: 1822
    bride's birthplace:
    bride's age: 23
    marriage date: 27 Jan 1845
    marriage place: Launceston, Tasmania, Australia
    groom's father's name:
    groom's mother's name:
    bride's father's name:
    bride's mother's name:
    groom's race:
    groom's marital status: Widowed
    groom's previous wife's name:
    bride's race:
    bride's marital status: Widowed
    bride's previous husband's name:
    indexing project (batch) number: M13531-3
    system origin: Australia
    source film number: 1368287
    reference number:
    Collection: "Australia, Marriages, 1810-1980," Richard Chugg, 1845.
  11. Find my past web sites, online http://www.findmypast.com or http://www.findmypast.com.au, original doc accessed.
  12. Tasmanian Archives database: Surname: CHUGG
    Given Names: RICHARD
    Event: Death
    Father/Spouse Surname:
    Mother/Spouse Given Names:
    Day: 10
    Month: 4
    Year: 1861
    Age: 64
    Sex: M
    Spouse Age:
    Spouse Sex:
    Registration Place: LAUNCESTON
    Registration Number: 102/1861
    Reference: RGD 35.
  13. International Genealogical Index (IGI), https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XTCN-JXQ
    groom's name: Henry Chugg
    groom's birth date: 1844
    groom's birthplace:
    groom's age: 26
    bride's name: Frances Jordan
    bride's birth date: 1850
    bride's birthplace:
    bride's age: 20
    marriage date: 18 May 1870
    marriage place: Evandale, Tasmania, Australia
    groom's father's name:
    groom's mother's name:
    bride's father's name:
    bride's mother's name:
    groom's race:
    groom's marital status:
    groom's previous wife's name:
    bride's race:
    bride's marital status:
    bride's previous husband's name:
    indexing project (batch) number: M31047-6
    system origin: Australia
    source film number: 1368299
    reference number:
    Collection: "Australia, Marriages, 1810-1980," Henry Chugg, 1870.
  14. Tasmanian Archives database: Surname: CHUGG
    Given Names: HENRY
    Event: Marriage
    Father/Spouse Surname: JORDAN
    Mother/Spouse Given Names: FRANCES
    Day: 18
    Month: 5
    Year: 1870
    Age: 26
    Sex: M
    Spouse Age: 20
    Spouse Sex: F
    Registration Place: MORVEN
    Registration Number: 542/1870
    Reference: RGD 37.
  15. Tasmanian Archives database: Headstone of Richard CHUGG . Died in 1861 aged 64yrs. Source: Evandale St Andrews Anglican Cemetery.
  16. Tasmanian Archives database: Chugg      Richard      1862      AD960/6      6      961.
  17. BDM in Australia, Aust Vital Records 1788-1905, 1494.