Thomas Cleghorn

#22845, b. circa 1578, d. 1659

Rare Tankard With Links to Royalty and Literary Giant. A rare mid 17th century silver mounted wooden tankard may be one of a pair of missing cups given to King George by Walter Scott for use at the ceremonial closing dinner for his state visit in 1822. The cup, made by Thomas Cleghorn of Edinburgh circa 1640, is valued at £8,000-12,000 and will be sold on the 16th August at the specialist Scottish Silver Sale.
UPDATE: This lot sold for £25,000 (including premium).

Individual's Timeline

Birthcirca 1578Thomas Cleghorn
Marriage31 December 1616Thomas Cleghorn1
Marriage of Son19 June 1656Edward Cleghorn2,3
Death1659Thomas Cleghorn4

Primary events

Secondary circumstances

  • Occupation: Thomas was a goldsmith. Thomas Cleghorne was the first of Daniel Crawford’s highly successful group of apprentices. He overlapped in the workshop with Alexander Reid I, and the two of these gentlemen are pivotal links for generating the vast majority of both 17th and 18th century Edinburgh goldsmiths.4
Some aspects of Thomas Cleghorn's life. Cleghorne produced three major goldsmiths among his six apprentices. His first John Scott (CB-3; SC-3), generated the Cleghorne-Scott Lineage. His fourth apprentice George Cleghorne, also became a freeman and his own son, Edward (CB-3; CY-3), is responsible for the Cleghorne-Yorstoun Lineage. Thomas Cleghorne served as Deacon for the Incorporation for the years 1640-42. The Incorporation Records indicate he died in 1659.
For an examples of his work see Silver pp 37-38, 42-43.

Silver = Silver Made in Scotland by George Dalgleish amd Henry Steuart Forthingham,
NMSE - Publishing, Edinburgh 2008.

- information supplied via email from Davd Powell " He was apprenticed as a Goldsmith at the age of 13 on 15 Jun 1591. Thomas’s father and mother were James Cleghorn and Janet (Jonet) Aikman. Source for the above information is a book called the “The Edinburgh Goldsmiths II” by Rodney Dietert and Janice Dietert. The book is available on Google books."
* He was apprenticed to David Broun Crawford on 15 Jun.1591.
* Thomas Cleghorne (1) was the first of Daniel Crawford’s highly successful group of apprentices. He overlapped in the workshop with Alexander Reid I, and the two of these gentlemen are pivotal links for generating the vast majority of both 17th and 18th century Edinburgh goldsmiths.

Anecdote - Musings and Reasonings

Research note (complicated): A possible descendent also named Thomas, a wine merchant at the grass-market, was a Bailie of Edinburgh, a Baillie being an alderman or town councillor. See exhibit
* This man or a descendant left a inventory dated 18th Sep 1840. He resided at the Grassmarket died at Dinisire near Biggar.
* Yet another Thomas CLEGHORN living in Grassmarket, at number 24, also left a will inventory 30th Sep 1858. He was a carver and gilder.
(both from Scotland's People).

Locus Operandi

  • 1578
  • 16594

Children of Thomas Cleghorn and Elspet (Elizabeth) Pearson

Citations

  1. International Genealogical Index (IGI), M119823      1595 - 1649.
  2. International Genealogical Index (IGI), LDS member submission.
  3. International Genealogical Index (IGI), M119824      1649 - 1688.
  4. R and Dietert J Dietert, The Edinburgh Goldsmiths II.
  5. International Genealogical Index (IGI), C116856      1616 - 1622.