Daniel Coe

#1688, b. circa 1812, d. 22 September 1887


Individual's Timeline

Birthcirca 1812Daniel Coe
Christening28 November 1812Daniel Coe
Christening28 November 1812Daniel Coe1
EmigratAU31 July 1833Daniel Coe2
Marriagebefore 1847Daniel Coe3
Death of Mother2 May 1850Elizabeth Westrop4
Death of Father25 August 1854John Coe5
Marriagebetween 1855 and 1856Daniel Coe
Marriage of Son1878Daniel Coe6
Marriage of Daughter21 May 1879Louisa Coe7
Death22 September 1887Daniel Coe8

Primary events

Secondary circumstances

  • Occupation: Daniel was a gardener, and a cow keeper.
  • EmigratAU: He emigrated to Australia on 31 July 1833 in ship 'Entrantress" from England. He was a convict. The ship sailed from Portsmouth, England, on 31st July, 1833, to Hobart. Docked 101 days later. Record shows he was single at the time.2
  • Criminal: On 26 October 1841, Daniel Coe was reported in the newspapers as being "charged on Thursday with making a disturbance by discharging firearms at a late hour of the night at Brown's River, and stating it was in consequence of his master's premises being attacked by robbers, was again brought up for examination, his statement appears to have been false, and the prisoner for his trouble ordered to the roads to hard labour for four mouths."9
  • Criminal: On 9 February 1843 in The Mercury, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, Daniel Coe was granted a ticket of leave, as listed in the Government Gazette # 43.10
  • Criminal: In 1849, Daniel Coe was granted a pardon after having been in the colony 15 years and 11 months. He had been living on a ticket of leave for 5 years and 4 months.
  • Note - illiterate: 1856 Daniel was illiterate.11
  • Residence: In 1856 Daniel lived in Battery Point, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.
  • Residence: In 1860 Daniel lived in George Street, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.
  • Residence: In 1864 Daniel lived in New Wharf Street, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.
  • Anecdote: DIRTY PREMISES.-Daniel Coe was summoned for allowing his premises to remain in a dirty con dition. He pleaded guilty. Evidence was taken to the effect that the defendant kept cows in a yard opposite the Montpelier Retreat, and that his premises were a nuisance to the neighborhood. In defence it was alleged that the yard was always kept clean but that as it lay low, it became a passage for the drainage of a number of other houses. Defendant said he had spoken to the landlord about it, but nothing had been done.

    , The Bench said they would postpone their decision for a week, and examine the premises.12
  • Residence: In 1866 Daniel lived in Montpilliar Retreat, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.
  • Residence: In 1867 Daniel lived in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.13
  • Criminal: On 26 August 1872, Daniel Coe was charged with stealing a bag of potatoes From Messers Fisher and Facy. He was remanded.14
  • Criminal: On 28 November 1873 in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, Daniel Coe was before the MAYOR'S COURT. It was reported as "Thursday, November. 27th, 1873. Before His Worship tho Mayor and Alderman Risby. Street Waifs - Daniel Coe, of Montpelier Road, was summoned by Mr. Mason, City Inspector, for allowing six cows and calf to wander in Newcastle street, on the 23rd Inst. Defendant admitted the offence; but hoped the Bench would deal mercifully with him as he was a poor man and had a wife and eight children. Tho Mayor said that the highest penalty was £3 for each animal, and the lowest 5s. I for each animal., Defendant was fined 5s for each animal; with costs. Time for payment was granted.

    This was not the first time Daniel had been charged with similar offences.15
  • Criminal: On 5 February 1875 in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, Daniel Coe was charged with larceny. -- Daniel Coe was brought up on remand by Detective Vickers, on the charge of having stolen certain articles, the property of Zachariah Yorke.

    The case had been previously adjourned in order to obtain the evidence of Mrs. Yorke. She deposed that the articles produced were her property. She saw the prisoner about half-past four on the morning that the articles had been stolen.

    By Mr. Moriarty : Witness kept the bag in the yard. There was no enclosed yard in front of her place. The yard was common to two houses. Witness had never offered to sell the clothes.

    Detective Vickers deposed to having, in company with the plaintiff, searched the house of the prisoner, and found the articles produced, which prisoner affirmed were his property. Witness then arrested him on the charge of larceny.

    Mr. Moriarty reverted to the feeling exhibited by Mrs. Yorke in her evidence, and the peculiarity of having such articles as those produced deposited in a common yard in a bag. He referred to the absurdity of making a larceny case of such rubbish as the articles referred to.

    John Coe, son of the prisoner, deposed he was in the habit of tending cows in Yorke's neighborhood. Witness spoke several times to Yorke and his wife while wearing the trousers produced in court. They never said a word to him about them. Witness believes the trousers produced were the same. An old quarry was in the vicinity of Yorke's house. Witness's father often brought' home old boots from that quarry.

    The bench said they had no doubt whatever of the prisoner's guilt. As that was his third appearance on the charge of larceny, they found it necessary to sentence him to 6 month's imprisonment with hard labour.16
Some aspects of Daniel Coe's life. THE ORPHAN SCHOOL APPRENTICE.-William McGivren, the Queen's Asylum apprentice to Daniel Coe, was again brought up.

The master intimated his willingness to have the indentures canceled. The Stipendiary Magistrate said that would re- lieve the Bench of a difficulty ; hut he observed that he had seen the indentures, and found that they were not dated in Dr. Coverdale's time ' at all ; he had also seen the Hon. Mr. Whyte, and he said positively he never recommended Coe for the boy. He would not say anything more as to what Mr. Whyte observed. .Coe stated that the recommendation was sent by Mr.W. Robert- son who told him he would attend to it, and he thought Mr. Whyte's signature was attached.

Mr. Macdowell : Any one is liable to be deceived ; public men sometimes are, and give recommendations under a wrong impression ; I have done that myself. Coe said he had spoken to Mr. Whyte himself Mr.

Macdowell : Oh ! you're a very plausible, specious gentleman,but the police have only done their duty in stating what came within their knowledge. However, as far as the boy is con- cerned, nothing has transpired since you had bim to call for remark farther than that you sent him I out with the cows, and let him do as he liked all day.

The order was then made for cancelling the indentures.17
Brushes with the LAW

Daniel was transported on the ship ENCHANTRESS to VDL for housebreaking. He was convicted at Essex on 26th July 1830 (summer assizes) of housebreaking and larceny, sentenced to life imprisonment by magistrate Pingle. This sentence was later mitigated down to transportation for life. His hulk report (the Leviathan) shows 'well behaved'. The ENTRANTRESS Ship sailed 31st July 1833 from Portsmouth, England, to Hobart. She docked 101 days later. Convict records show he was single at the time.

The Ipswich Journal dated 31st July 1830 reported that Daniel was sentenced to death for stealing diverse monies from the dwelling house of Mary Rule in Great Maplestead. I am guessing this seems a bit steep to anyone around to read this, BUT at the same assizes, John STAMMERS, a labourer aged 36, was convicted of an unnatural crime at Walton and he was also sentenced to death; The judge said 'leaving him no hopes of mercy in this world'.

In 1834 the Chelmsford Chronical published a list of people executed in the county of Essex in the past 75 years - John was there, so the judge kept his promise. The list starts in 1767. The first time 'Unnatural Crime' was mentioned as a reason for execution was 1810, and there were only 3 men executed in the 75 years for this crime. The Greens would be placated though, as one poor chap got hung for 'cutting down trees'.

In 1841 Daniel COE was reported in the newspapers as being "charged on Thursday with making a disturbance by discharging firearms at a late hour of the night at Brown's River, and stating it was in consequence of his master's premises being attacked by robbers, was again brought up for examination, his statement appears to have been false, and the prisoner for his trouble ordered to the roads to hard labour for four mouths"

In 1843, he was granted his Ticket of Leave. In 1849 granted a pardon after having been in the colony 15 years and 11 months. He had been living on a ticket of leave for 5 years and 4 months.

In 1865 we find another mention in the newspapers - DIRTY PREMISES.-Daniel Coe was summoned for allowing his premises to remain in a dirty condition. He pleaded guilty. Evidence was taken to the effect that the defendant kept cows in a yard opposite the Montpelier Retreat, and that his premises were a nuisance to the neighbourhood. In defence, it was alleged that the yard was always kept clean but that as it lay low, it became a passage for the drainage of a number of other houses. Defendant said he had spoken to the landlord about it, but nothing had been done.

In 1866 Daniel again came under notice – He had an apprentice from the Orphan School, but he was not training the boy in anything, just letting him take to cows out in the morning and allowing to do what he liked all day. The apprenticeship was cancelled.

In 1872, he was charged with stealing a bag of potatoes, for which he was remanded.

In 1873, Daniel Coe, of Montpelier Road, was summoned by Mr. Mason, City Inspector, for allowing six cows and calf to wander in Newcastle street. Daniel admitted the offence but “hoped the Bench would deal mercifully with him as he was a poor man and had a wife and eight children”. The Mayor said that the highest penalty was £3 for each animal, and the lowest 5s. for each animal. Defendant was fined 5s for each animal; with costs. Time for payment was granted. This was not the first time Daniel had been charged with similar offences. Shirley’s note – there is a theme in the newspaper stories that comes through. Daniel was a rogue, but one with a winning way. He seems to get the lightest of treatment (except of course for the original sentence, transportation for life).

Then it all finally caught up with him. He was given 6 month’s hard labour – at the age of 62 – for larceny. This was, according to the Bench, the third time Daniel had appeared before them for the same charge.

After this, it all goes quiet. I wonder if he learned his lesson, or was just too old to carry on as before?

On the other hand, he was in the papers for a better reason in 1856 - SUICIDAL ATTEMPT.-An elderly woman named Margaret Caughlin, wife of a man named Caughlin who keeps a lodging house in Goulboum-street attempted self-destruction by jumping from the landing stage for the passengers by the steamers into the river, yesterday morning. The unfortunate woman ran for some distance to the edge of the stage and having placed her gown over her head, made the jump before anyone could arrest her progress. A servant of J. Foster, Esq., Hampden Road, named Daniel Coe instantly plunged in to save the woman and the watermen witnessing the accident immediately put off to his assistance. She was ultimately rescued, and Dr. McCarthy, who promptly arrived on hearing of the accident, administered such restoratives as soon restored the woman to a knowledge of her situation. The police then took charge of her, and she was brought up before Mr. Abbott, at the police-office, to-day. The charge of attempted self-destruction having been fully proved, she was called upon to find sureties, herself in £50 and two sureties in £25, for her future conduct ; in default, she was committed to prison for three months.18,19

Commemoration

His death was commemorated by an obituary in the Hobart newspapers on 1 October 1887 in The Mercury, Tasmania, Australia, On September 22nd at his residence 27 Francis Street Daniel Coe in the 74th year of his age, a native of Essex, England, leaving a wife and family to mourne their loss. Friends are respectfully invited to attend his funeral at 9 o'clock Sunday Morning.20

Research Notes

  • Research note 06: Daniel COE (Enchantress) applied for permission to marry Hannah WEBB (free). This may not have eventuated.....21
  • Research note 01: Daniel was a convict. Birth details may be within his trial record? Mother(s) of his children need to be investigated. In a newspaper story in 1873 Daniel claimed to have eight children and a wife to support, so there is at least one we have not found yet.
  • Research note 02: Mary Ann the mother of Martha did not die until 1884, long after Daniel married Elizabeth CROUCH. There is lots more to work through before we understand the relationships between Daniel, his 2 'wives' and his children and grandchildren..
  • Research note 03: 2nd March 1835 John COE from Essex was sentenced to transportation for life for horse stealing. This man was said to be born c 1813, so may not be our John. He left England, bound for Tasmania, on the Aurora 18th June 1835. John's record whilst in the colony was 'not good'. He was sent to Norfolk Island for 7 years. This is not dated, but the last entry in his long list of offences was for stealing a coat and other articles on 27th June 1837.
  • Research note 04: With assistance from an email contact, I found a Chr in Great Maplestead in Essex at the right date for Daniel. Whilst there is no documentary proof the Daniel born in Great Maplestead is the same one who was transported to Tasmania, the close match to the place of birth quoted on his convict record is enough for me to undertake research to try to prove the connection.
    1. Is NOT buried with the rest of the family in Great Maplestead.
    2. Does NOT appear in any census in England.
  • Research note 05: I have a theory regarding Mary Ann HAPPS. The only name I can come up with in Tasmania is Mary Ann EPPS, a convict who was granted a ticket of leave in 1845/6. The notation says she has completed more than 4 years of her 7 year sentence (she had been in the colony 3 and a half years), and her conduct having been exemplary, she was pardoned early. Mary Ann arrived in the Emma Eugenia 8th April 1842. Her trial was at the Old Bailey 20th Sept 1841. She was 20 at the time of her trial, she was guilty of larceny, and had prior convictions. HOWEVER - her convict records show she was married after her conviction before she got to Tasmania. Nothing is mentioned about her husband's name, nor if he came to AU with her.
    * To have been married for 6 months before arriving, and to have been married after her conviction, the marriage must have taken place Sept or Dec qtr 1841.
    * When Mary Ann arrived, she was said to be from Worcester, and that she had been a house and a kitchen maid.
    * Her indent record says her husband is Richard, in the City of London, her father is John a glover, and 3 brothers and 2 sisters - George, John, Charles, Elizabeth and Sarah. Her relegion is C of E, and she could read and write. It also says she was convicted of stealing ribbons from Mr Kingston in Westminster
    * Finding her husband's name lead me to the marriage. Richard EPPS married Mary Ann MARSH in Newington Spt qtr 1841. She was a minor, he was a full aged cab proprietor - see exhibit for the register entry. One point of contention is that she 'marked' the register, but her father WAS John. (deceased). Another point against is that the marriage occured 4th August which was BEFORE her conviction, not after. Grooms father was John EPPS a publican. The couple were living in 22 New Street, Newington, Surry, at the time of the wedding. 1841 census has a Richard AND a Mary EPPS living in New Street. He is a 'cab', and neither were born in Surrey. Their ages were 30 and 25 (rounded down). This Richard disappears from the census after 1841.

    A New Zealander, Marion, is the 3GGd and she has her name as TAPPS, with a move to NZ with Daniel around 1852..

Children of Daniel Coe and Mary Ann Happs

Children of Daniel Coe and Elizabeth Crouch

Citations

  1. Free parish registers, online http://www.freereg.org.uk,      Essex
    Place     Great Maplestead
    Church     St Giles
    RegisterNumber     
    DateOfBirth     
    BaptismDate     28 Nov 1812
    Forename     Daniel
    Sex     M
    FatherForename     John
    MotherForename     Elizabeth
    FatherSurname     COE
    MotherSurname     
    Abode     
    FatherOccupation     
    Notes     Seax D-P 83-1-1
    FileNumber     18435.
  2. Tasmanian Archives database: index numbers from information in Tasmanian Archives - CUS 30 p211, CS 01/651/14608, G 03/1 P291, WS 31/1 P11.
    Details of the ship from 'convict ships' on the net are: Ship 'Enchantress' arrived 31/7/1833, sailed from Portsmouth 13/4/1833, took 109 days. There were 200 male prisoners on board, 1 died during the voyage. Ships master was Thomas CANNEY, and the ships surgeon was James Osbourne.
  3. BDM in Australia, Aust Vital Records 1788-1905.
  4. Free parish registers, online http://www.freereg.org.uk, Parish Records Collection 1538-2005 - Burial
    First name(s):      Elizabeth
    Last name      COE
    Date of burial:      5 May 1850
    Age at death:      67
    Calculated year of birth:      1783
    Place of burial:      Great Maplestead
    Dedication:      St Giles
    County:      Essex
    Notes:      
    Great Maplestead St Giles
    Denomination:      Anglican
    Coverage:      1678 - 1935
    Number of entries      1,566
    Record source:      National Burial Index
    Data provider:      Essex Society for Family History.
  5. Free parish registers, online http://www.freereg.org.uk, Parish Records Collection 1538-2005 - Burial
    First name(s):      John
    Last name      COE
    Date of burial:      29 Aug 1854
    Age at death:      79
    Calculated year of birth:      1775
    Place of burial:      Great Maplestead
    Dedication:      St Giles
    County:      Essex
    Notes:      
    Great Maplestead St Giles
    Denomination:      Anglican
    Coverage:      1678 - 1935
    Number of entries      1,566
    Record source:      National Burial Index
    Data provider:      Essex Society for Family History.
  6. New Zealand BDM Index on line, online http://www.bdmhistoricalrecords.identityservices.govt.nz, 1878/2496     Sophia      Moore      Daniel      Coe.
  7. BDM in Australia, Aust Vital Records 1788-1905, 37/251.
  8. BDM in Australia, Aust Vital Records 1788-1905, 1887/955 33/955.
  9. Trove - Australian Newspapers on line, online http://trove.nla.gov.au, The Mercury, Tuesday 26th October, 1841, page 4.
  10. Trove - Australian Newspapers on line, online http://trove.nla.gov.au, The Mercury, Friday 17th February, 1843, page 2.
  11. Tasmanian Archives database: Name:
    Coe, John
    Record Type:
    Births
    Gender:
    Male
    Father:
    Coe, Daniel
    Mother:
    Crouch, Elizabeth
    Date of birth:
    15 Nov 1856
    Registered:
    Hobart
    Registration year:
    1856
    Record ID:
    NAME_INDEXES:961499
    Resource
    RGD33/1/6/ no 1975.
  12. Trove - Australian Newspapers on line, online http://trove.nla.gov.au, The Mercury, Friday 20th January, 1865, page 2.
  13. Website Residents of Hobart 1867 (http://www.fortunecity.com//lavendar/pimlico/20/hobart1.txt).
  14. Trove - Australian Newspapers on line, online http://trove.nla.gov.au, The Mercury, Monday 26 August, 1872, page 2.
  15. Trove - Australian Newspapers on line, online http://trove.nla.gov.au, The Mercury, Friday 28th November, 1873, page 2.
  16. Trove - Australian Newspapers on line, online http://trove.nla.gov.au, The Mercury, Monday 8th February,1875, page 2.
  17. Trove - Australian Newspapers on line, online http://trove.nla.gov.au, The Mercury, Manday 21st May, 1866, page 2.
  18. Tasmanian Archives database: Details of the ship from 'convict ships' on the net are: Ship 'Enchantress' arrived 31/7/1833, sailed from Portsmouth 13/4/1833, took 109 days. There were 200 male prisoners on board, 1 died during the voyage. Ships master was Thomas CANNEY, and the ships surgeon was James Osbourne.

    index numbers from information in Tasmanian Archives - CUS 30 p211, CS 01/651/14608, G 03/1 P291, WS 31/1 P11.
  19. Find my past web sites, online http://www.findmypast.com or http://www.findmypast.com.au, Chelmsford Chronicle 04 April 1834.
  20. Trove - Australian Newspapers on line, online http://trove.nla.gov.au, The Mercury, Saturday 24th September 1887 page 1.
  21. Conclusion of, Tasmanian Field Trip, April 2000, Tasmanian Archives CON 52/2 P23?
  22. BDM in Australia, Aust Vital Records 1788-1905, Birth 1847/218
    death 1848/2060.
  23. BDM in Australia, Aust Vital Records 1788-1905, 1850/2100.